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3.2 Functional Layer

The Functional Layer defines -- irrespective of existing technologies and applications -- the functional requirements of the International Data Spaces, and the features to be implemented resulting thereof.
Functional architecture of the International Data Spaces

Figure 3.2: Functional architecture of the International Data Spaces

The figure above shows the functional architecture of the International Data Spaces, subdividing the requirements into six groups of software functionality to be provided by the IDS. These six groups comply with the strategic requirements outlined in Section Goals of the International Data Spaces.
The following subsections give a brief summary of these functional requirements.

Trust

Although requirements related to trust are usually non-functional, they are addressed by the Functional Layer, since they represent fundamental features of the International Data Spaces. The Trust group comprises three main aspects (roles, identity management, and user certification), which are complemented by governance aspects (see Section on Data Governance.

Roles

Each role in the International Data Spaces has certain rights and duties. For example, the Identity Provider is responsible for offering services to create, maintain, manage, monitor, and validate identity information of and for participants in the International Data Spaces. More information about the roles is given in the Business Layer.

Identity Management

Every Connector participating in the International Data Spaces must have a unique identifier and a valid certificate. In addition, each Connector must be able to verify the identity of other Connectors (with special conditions being applied here; e.g., security profiles).

User Certification

Each participant in the International Data Spaces must undergo certification in order to establish trust among all participants. More information about the certification process is given in the Certification Perspective.

Security and Data Sovereignty

Like requirements related to trust, requirements related to security and data sovereignty are also usually non-functional, but are still addressed by the Functional Layer, since they represent fundamental features of the International Data Spaces. The Security and data sovereignty group contains four major aspects: authentication authorization; usage policies usage enforcement; trustworthy communication security by design; and technical certification.

Authentication & Authorization

Each Connector must have a valid X.509 certificate (or equivalent). With the help of this certificate, each participant in the International Data Spaces that operates an endpoint is able to verify the identity of any other participant. Certain conditions (e.g. security profiles) may also apply here. More information about authentication is given in the Security Perspective.
The Connector serving as the data source must be able to verify the receiving Connector's capabilities and security features as well as its identity. More information about authorization is given in the Security Perspective.

Usage Policies & Usage Enforcement

In the IDS, Data Owners and Data Providers can always be sure their data is handled by a Data Consumer according to the usage policies specified. Each participant can define usage policies and attach them to outbound data. Policies might include restrictions, such as disallowing persistence of data, or disallowing transfer of data to other parties, for example. More information about usage policies and usage enforcement is given in the Security Perspective.

Trustworthy Communication & Security by Design

Connectors, App Stores, and any Metadata Broker can check if the Connector of the connecting party is running a trusted (i.e. certified) software stack. Any communication between (external) Connectors can be encrypted and integrity protected. Each Data Owner and Data Provider must be able to ensure that their data is handled by the Connector of the Data Consumer according to the usage policies specified: otherwise the data will not be sent. To reduce the impact of compromised applications, appropriate technical measures must be applied (e.g. isolating Data Apps from each other and from the Connector). Data Providers and Data Consumers can decide about the level of security to be applied for their respective Connectors by deploying Connectors supporting the selected security profile. More information about trustworthy communication and security by design is given in the Security Perspective.

Technical Certification

The core components of the International Data Spaces, and especially the Connectors, require certification from the Certification Body in order to establish trust among all participants. More information about technical certification is given in the Certification Perspective.

Ecosystem of Data

Being able to describe, find and correctly interpret data is another key aspect of the International Data Spaces. Therefore, every data source in the International Data Spaces is described on the Information Layer (see section 3.3).
The Ecosystem of Data group comprises three major aspects: data source description, metadata brokering, and vocabularies.

Data Source Description

Participants must have the opportunity to describe, publish, maintain and manage different versions of metadata. Metadata should describe the syntax and serialization as well as the semantics of data sources. Furthermore, metadata should describe the application domain of the data source. The operator of a Connector must be able to define the price, the pricing model, and the usage policies regarding certain data. More information about data source description is given in the Information Layer.

Metadata Brokering

The operator of a Connector must be able to provide an interface for data and metadata access. Each Connector must be able to transmit metadata of its data sources to one or more Metadata Brokers. Each participant must be able to browse and search metadata in the metadata repository, provided the participant has the right to access the metadata. Furthermore, each participant must be able to browse the list of participants registered at a Metadata Broker. More information about metadata brokering is given in the Process Layer.

Vocabularies

To create and structure metadata, the operator of a Connector may use vocabularies. In doing so, an operator of a Connector can use existing vocabularies, create own vocabularies, or work with other operators on new vocabularies provided by vocabulary hubs. Vocabulary hubs are central servers that store vocabularies and enable collaboration. Collaboration may comprise search, selection, matching, updating, requests for changes, version management, deletion, duplicate identification, and unused vocabularies. Vocabulary hubs need to be managed. More information about vocabularies is given in the Information Layer.

Standardized Interoperability

Standardized data exchange between participants is the fundamental aspect of the International Data Spaces. The IDS Connector is the main technical component for this purpose.

Operation

Participants should be able to run the Connector software in their own IT environment. Alternatively, they can run a Connector on mobile or embedded devices. The operator of the Connector must be able to define the data workflow inside the Connector. Users of the Connector must be identifiable and manageable. Passwords and key storage must be protected. Every action, data access, data transmission, incident, etc. should be logged. Using this logging data, it should be possible to draw up statistical evaluations on data usage etc. Notifications about incidents should be sent automatically.

Data Exchange

The Connector must receive data from an enterprise backend system, either through a push-mechanism or a pull-mechanism. The data can be provided via an interface or pushed directly to other participants. To do so, each Connector must be uniquely identifiable. Other Connectors can subscribe to data sources or pull data from these sources. Data can be written into the backend system of other participants.

Value Adding Apps

Before or after the actual data exchange, data may need to be processed or transformed. For this purpose, the International Data Spaces offers Data Apps. Each Data App has a lifecycle, spanning its implementation, provision in the App Store, installation, and support. The App Store should therefore be clearly visible and recognizable to every participant.

Data Processing and Transformation

A data processing app (which is a subtype of a Data App) should provide a single, clearly defined processing function to be applied on input data for producing an expected output. A data transformation app (also a subtype of a Data App) should be able to transform data from an input format into a different output format in order to comply with the requirements of the Data Consumer (without any substantial change made to the information contained in the data; i.e., loss-less transformation).

Data App Implementation

The developers of Data Apps should be able to annotate the software with metadata (about functions and interfaces, pricing models, licenses, etc.). Data Apps must explicitly define their interfaces, dependencies, and access requirements.

Providing Data Apps

Any authorized Data App developer can initiate a software provision process (App Store publication). Prior to publication in the App Store, Data Apps must pass an optional evaluation and certification process controlled by the Certification Body. The App Store should support authorized users in their search for a suitable application in an adequate fashion. Access of privileged users (e.g., administrators or operators) should require strong authentication (e.g., 2-factor authentication).

Installing and Supporting Data Apps

A dedicated Connector service should support authorized users in (un-)installing Data Apps not originating from an official App Store. In addition, it should support authorized users in searching, installing, and managing (e.g., removal or automated updates) Data Apps retrieved from an App Store.

Data Markets

Data to be exchanged in the International Data Spaces may have monetary value. Therefore, the International Data Spaces has to integrate data market concepts, like clearing and billing, but also governance.

Clearing & Billing

The Data Owner can define the pricing model (e.g. pay per transfer, pay per access, pay per day/month/year), and the price of data. Any transaction of any participant can be logged. The clearing and billing process must be simple and standardized.

Usage restrictions and governance

Governance in the International Data Spaces comprises five aspects: data as an economic good, data ownership, data sovereignty, data quality, and data provenance. More information about governance is given in Governance Perspective.
Trading data on a data marketplace requires legal contracts and conditions that can be negotiated in an automated way. Therefore, standard contracts for typical data exchange transactions are necessary.